Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (2024)

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (1)

5 from 15 votes

Prep Time : 10 minutes minutes

Cook Time : 15 minutes minutes

This easy fudge recipe with marshmallow fluff makes the smoothest, most decadent fudge you've ever had—all without condensed milk or corn syrup. Make your own fluff easily at home, or use store bought!

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Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (2)

This gluten free fudge recipe is smooth as silk, with tons of rich chocolate flavor. The sugary sweetness is balanced with just the right amount of buttery flavor and rich, melted chocolate.

Serve it chilled until cold, or at cool room temperature for the type of fudge you can really sink your teeth into!

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (3)

Why is this the best gluten free no-fail fudge recipe?

This classic fudge recipe is adapted from the recipe for fantasy fudge on the side of the Kraft brand's Marshmallow Creme, but with dark chocolate instead of semi-sweet chips. And we begin with a batch of our homemade version of that marshmallow goodness.

This fudge is still solid even as it warms up, which is exactly the consistency you want. Fudge is usually served chilled, but it shouldn't melt at cool room temperature.

If you don't count the time it takes to set up in the refrigerator, this fudge only takes minutes to make. All you need is a candy thermometer; if you don't have one yet, now it's finally time. 🌡

This recipe won't fail. And it won't stress you out!

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (4)

How to make marshmallow fluff for this no fail fudge recipe

The marshmallow mixture has just a few essential ingredients: egg whites, sugar, and water. The recipe also calls for cream of tartar, salt, and vanilla, but you can make the fluff without them.

Whip the egg whites

We begin by whipping raw egg whites until they form soft peaks when you pull the whisk away. The peaks shouldn't seem dry or crumbly at all, and should fall over on themselves when you turn the whisk upright.

If you're concerned about the raw egg whites, you can always use egg whites from the carton, which are already pasteurized. They may not form perfectly stable peaks when you whip them, so your fluff will be a little more limp and soft, but the recipe will still work.

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (5)

Cook the sugar

Next, cook the sugar solution to softball stage (240°F). The least expensive candy thermometer is all you need. Here's the type of candy thermometer you see in the photos and video.

Next, pour the hot sugar mixture down the side of the mixer bowl, taking care to avoid hitting the whisk as it whips, or the sugar mixture will splatter. Then whip whip whip.

Once the fluff/creme is made, you can put it in a sealed container and store it in the refrigerator for at least 3 days. This fudge is only moments away once the fluff is done.

If you remember how easy it was to turn homemade gluten free corn free marshmallows into rice krispie treats, then you won't be at all afraid of making this fudge (marshmallows set up with gelatin, and fluff uses egg whites for structure – they're otherwise nearly the same).

And if you thought you didn't love marshmallow creme, then you haven't had homemade marshmallow creme.

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (6)

Corn-free marshmallow fluff fudge

This marshmallow fudge is made using cream of tartar in the fluff recipe, to help stabilize the sugar as it cooks. Corn syrup is often used when you're cooking sugar as a stablizier, which prevents the sugar from forming crystals as it heats.

I don't mind using corn syrup. But I know that lots of people either must avoid corn products, or simply don't like even the idea of corn syrup (that's why our gluten free pecan pie is made without corn syrup, after all!).

If you don't have cream of tartar, you can replace it with a tablespoon of light corn syrup, if that works for you. You can also try using 1 teaspoon of freshly squeezed lemon juice.

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (7)

Tips for making the best gluten free marshmallow fudge

If you're new to cooking sugar, for the marshmallow fluff or the marshmallow fudge itself, here are some tips to ensure success the very first time.

  • Cook sugar on medium-high heat, at most. If your stovetop runs hot, use low heat and be patient.
  • A simple, analog candy thermometer is a must-have to cook sugar. Cooking for fixed time periods can lead to broken mixtures.
  • For easily scoopable marshmallow fluff/creme, chill it for up to a day ahead of time.
  • Slice your fudge into squares when it's not quite rock hard.
  • Run your cutting knife under warm water before slicing your fudge.
  • Nervous? Try a half recipe of fudge first, until you get the hang of it.
  • Be sure you're using evaporated milk, not sweetened condensed milk! Holy toothache!
Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (8)

Gluten free fudge stir-in ideas

This is a simple, classic fudge recipe, that suits my family just as it is. But you can also make it much more interesting by adding flavorings and even some mix-ins.

As you're folding the marshmallow fluff into the mixture, add up to 1 full cup of mix-ins. My favorites are peanut butter morsels, white chocolate morsels, and even crushed Butterfinger candies.

How to make rocky road no fail fudge

You can make nearly anything chocolate into rocky road chocolate by mixing in walnuts, chocolate chips, and mini marshmallows. Instead of miniature marshmallows, just add some additional swirls of marshmallow creme.

In fact, our no churn rocky road ice cream is also made with a marshmallow creme base—and that's been a gluten free dairy free fan favorite for years!

How to make peppermint marshmallow fudge

There's plenty of vanilla extract in this fudge recipe, both in the marshmallow creme recipe and in the fudge itself. Try making it peppermint by replacing one of the vanilla extracts with peppermint extract.

You can also try crushing some candy canes and adding the crushed bits to the fudge as you're folding in the marshmallow creme. Or just sprinkle crushed candy canes on top instead of more marshmallow.

How to store this delicious fudge

The sugar in this fudge recipe keeps it fresh for quite a while. You can store it cut into squares, or uncut in a single slab.

If you'd like to store it in squares, pile the squares into a tightly sealed container with rigid sides. Refrigerate for weeks and it should still taste fresh.

To store it in a single slab, remove it from the pan and peel off the foil. Wrap it tightly in freezer-safe wrap and store it in the refrigerator or freezer for even longer.

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (9)

FAQs

Are marshmallows gluten free?

Most commercially available brands of packaged marshmallows are gluten free, since they're made with very few ingredients and none of them is necessarily gluten-containing. But you should always read labels, and call the company if you're not sure.

Why is my fantasy fudge grainy?

If your fudge, and maybe your marshmallow creme before it, is grainy, your sugars have probably crystallized. Adding cream of tartar or another acid helps prevent crystallization of cooked sugar.

Crystallization happens when some sugar comes out of solution during cooking, dries out, and becomes a grain again. If it returns to the rest of the mixture as a dry crystal, it starts a chain reaction in the rest of the cooking sugar.

Why is my fantasy fudge too soft?

If your fudge is setting up too soft, you probably didn't cook your sugar to the softball stage, either in the fluff/creme or when you boiled the butter and sugar for the fudge itself. Be sure you're using a candy thermometer, or you know how to use the cold water test for cooking sugar.

Honestly, even though you may find using a candy thermometer to be intimidating, it takes all the guesswork out of cooking sugar. By the time you drop some cooked sugar into a glass of cold water to see if it's the proper “soft ball” consistency, your sugar is usually overcooked and hard!

Can you freeze marshmallow fluff fudge?

Yes! You can freeze marshmallow fluff fudge. If I'm going to freeze fudge, I prefer to freeze it before I slice it.

Why is my gluten free fudge oily?

Be careful not to have the heat too high under the butter and sugar mixture when you're making the fudge. If your heat is too high, you risk burning the sugar before it hits the right temperature—and your butter may separate.

If your butter separates during cooking, your fudge mixture won't be fully combined and your fudge may seem oily. Patience is a virtue when cooking sugar!

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (10)

Substitution suggestions for no fail fudge ingredients

Gluten free dairy free marshmallow fudge

Replace the butter with vegan butter, to keep that butter flavor but get rid of the dairy. Miyoko's Kitchen and Melt brands are best.

In place of cow's milk evaporated milk, try using coconut milk evaporated milk. Or just simmer some of your favorite unsweetened nondairy milk on the stovetop over low heat until it's reduced by at least half.

Can you make gluten free egg free marshmallow fudge?

Maybe! You may be able to replace the marshmallow fluff, which is made with egg whites, with gluten free marshmallows (made with gelatin).

That's a lot of granulated sugar, huh?

I don't know how to make this recipe without granulated sugar. If you'd like to make candy recipes with alternative sugars, I suggest seeking out a keto blog.

I don't recommend replacing any of the granulated sugar with coconut sugar, which is heavier and much grainer. Remember, to your body, sugar is sugar!

How to make this easy no fail marshmallow fudge recipe, step by step

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (11)

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Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff

This easy fudge recipe with marshmallow fluff makes the smoothest, most decadent fudge you've ever had—all without condensed milk or corn syrup. Make your own fluff easily at home, or use store bought!

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Prep Time: 10 minutes minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes minutes

Setting time: 4 hours hours

Yield: 16 pieces

Author: Nicole Hunn

Equipment

  • Candy thermometer

Ingredients

For the homemade marshmallow fluff

  • 2 (50 g) egg whites at room temperature
  • 1 ¼ cups (250 g) granulated sugar
  • ½ cup (4 fluid ounces) water
  • teaspoon cream of tartar
  • teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the fudge

  • 12 tablespoons (160 g) unsalted butter chopped
  • 3 cups (600 g) granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 5 ounces evaporated milk
  • 12 ounces dark chocolate chopped (try using chocolate with at least 70% cacao)
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 7 ounces Marshmallow Creme or Fluff homemade or store bought, plus more for swirling on top

Instructions

Make the marshmallow fluff.

  • In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the egg whites until they form soft peaks. Set the bowl aside briefly.

  • In a medium saucepan, place the sugar, water, cream of tartar and salt, and whisk together.

  • Cook the mixture over medium-high heat until it reaches the softball stage (between 235°F and 240°F on an instant read candy thermometer). Be sure not to cook the sugar on high heat, or the sugar and burn.

  • Remove the cooked sugar from the heat, and pour carefully down the side of the stand mixer bowl, with the mixer on low speed (making sure the sugar mixture doesn’t hit the whisk).

  • Add the vanilla extract, and increase the mixer to high speed. Beat until stiff peaks form (5 to 7 minutes).

Make the fudge.

  • Line an 8-inch or 9-inch square pan with aluminum foil, allowing some foil to overhang the pan. Smooth out any wrinkles. Grease the foil completely (or use nonstick aluminum foil), and set the pan aside.

  • In a clean, medium saucepan, place the butter, sugar, salt, and evaporated milk. Place the saucepan over medium to medium-high heat, and bring the mixture to a boil.

  • Cook, stirring occasionally, until it reaches 235°F (about 6 minutes). If your mixture is taking a long time to reach the proper temperature, you can try covering the pan loosely with a cover, so less heat is escaping during cooking.

  • Remove the pan from the heat. Working quickly, add the chopped chocolate and mix until the chocolate is melted. Add the vanilla, then the 7 ounces of marshmallow fluff. Using a silicone or other nonstick spatula, turn the mixture over gently until completely combined.

  • Working quickly, pour the fudge into the prepared pan and smooth into an even layer. Scatter a few small dollops of marshmallow fluff over the top of the fudge, and swirl with a knife or spatula.

  • Allow the fudge to cool for about 20 minutes at room temperature, and then place in the refrigerator to chill for about 4 hours, until solid.

  • Remove from the refrigerator. If you've left the fudge in the refrigerator for up to 12 hours, it may be a bit too solid to slice without crumbling. Allow it to sit at room temperature until it can be sliced easily with a warm knife.

  • Lift the fudge out of the pan by the overhung foil. Let a large, sharp knife run under warm water, and slice the fudge into 16 pieces. Moisten the knife under warm water after each cut.

  • Serve immediately. Store leftover pieces in a sealed container in the refrigerator. This fudge will keep chilled for weeks.

Notes

Originally published on the blog in 2013. Recipe unchanged; video and most photos new; most text new.

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (12)

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Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff

This easy fudge recipe with marshmallow fluff makes the smoothest, most decadent fudge you've ever had—all without condensed milk or corn syrup. Make your own fluff easily at home, or use store bought!

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Prep Time: 10 minutes minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes minutes

Setting time: 4 hours hours

Yield: 16 pieces

Author: Nicole Hunn

Equipment

  • Candy thermometer

Ingredients

For the homemade marshmallow fluff

  • 2 (50 g) egg whites at room temperature
  • 1 ¼ cups (250 g) granulated sugar
  • ½ cup (4 fluid ounces) water
  • teaspoon cream of tartar
  • teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the fudge

  • 12 tablespoons (160 g) unsalted butter chopped
  • 3 cups (600 g) granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 5 ounces evaporated milk
  • 12 ounces dark chocolate chopped (try using chocolate with at least 70% cacao)
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 7 ounces Marshmallow Creme or Fluff homemade or store bought, plus more for swirling on top

Instructions

Make the marshmallow fluff.

  • In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the egg whites until they form soft peaks. Set the bowl aside briefly.

  • In a medium saucepan, place the sugar, water, cream of tartar and salt, and whisk together.

  • Cook the mixture over medium-high heat until it reaches the softball stage (between 235°F and 240°F on an instant read candy thermometer). Be sure not to cook the sugar on high heat, or the sugar and burn.

  • Remove the cooked sugar from the heat, and pour carefully down the side of the stand mixer bowl, with the mixer on low speed (making sure the sugar mixture doesn’t hit the whisk).

  • Add the vanilla extract, and increase the mixer to high speed. Beat until stiff peaks form (5 to 7 minutes).

Make the fudge.

  • Line an 8-inch or 9-inch square pan with aluminum foil, allowing some foil to overhang the pan. Smooth out any wrinkles. Grease the foil completely (or use nonstick aluminum foil), and set the pan aside.

  • In a clean, medium saucepan, place the butter, sugar, salt, and evaporated milk. Place the saucepan over medium to medium-high heat, and bring the mixture to a boil.

  • Cook, stirring occasionally, until it reaches 235°F (about 6 minutes). If your mixture is taking a long time to reach the proper temperature, you can try covering the pan loosely with a cover, so less heat is escaping during cooking.

  • Remove the pan from the heat. Working quickly, add the chopped chocolate and mix until the chocolate is melted. Add the vanilla, then the 7 ounces of marshmallow fluff. Using a silicone or other nonstick spatula, turn the mixture over gently until completely combined.

  • Working quickly, pour the fudge into the prepared pan and smooth into an even layer. Scatter a few small dollops of marshmallow fluff over the top of the fudge, and swirl with a knife or spatula.

  • Allow the fudge to cool for about 20 minutes at room temperature, and then place in the refrigerator to chill for about 4 hours, until solid.

  • Remove from the refrigerator. If you've left the fudge in the refrigerator for up to 12 hours, it may be a bit too solid to slice without crumbling. Allow it to sit at room temperature until it can be sliced easily with a warm knife.

  • Lift the fudge out of the pan by the overhung foil. Let a large, sharp knife run under warm water, and slice the fudge into 16 pieces. Moisten the knife under warm water after each cut.

  • Serve immediately. Store leftover pieces in a sealed container in the refrigerator. This fudge will keep chilled for weeks.

Notes

Originally published on the blog in 2013. Recipe unchanged; video and most photos new; most text new.

Foolproof Gluten Free Marshmallow Fudge Recipe With Easy Homemade Fluff (2024)

FAQs

Why won t my marshmallow fudge harden? ›

The main reason is that your Fudge has not reached the optimum temperature. If your mixture only reaches 110 or 112 degrees Celsius it will always be soft. That's why we recommend investing in a sugar thermometer. Another reason your Fudge is not setting is that the ratio of liquid to sugar is too high.

Can you substitute marshmallow fluff for marshmallow creme? ›

Is marshmallow creme the same as marshmallow fluff? While they have similar consistencies and flavor there is one notable difference between creme and fluff. Creme contains cream of tartar while fluff does not, making it ideal for use in fudge.

Is Jet Puffed marshmallow fluff gluten-free? ›

Kraft Jet-Puffed Marshmallows are also usually gluten-free. But, according to a Kraft company consumer helpline representative, some of their products — such as marshmallows — have a 50 percent chance of containing natural flavorings sourced from suppliers who use grains with gluten.

Why is my marshmallow fudge dry? ›

Too little time and the water won't evaporate, causing the fudge to be soft. Conversely, cook it too long and fudge won't contain enough water, making it hard with a dry, crumbly texture. Pay attention to the timetable specified in the recipe, and you'll get the hang of it after a batch or two.

How do you rescue fudge that won't set? ›

OPTION 3) Sieve together some powdered sugar and cocoa powder, and gradually work this into your unset fudge until it reaches the consistency of dough, then roll out and cut into squares, or shape into balls and then roll in powdered sugar (roll the balls in icing sugar, not yourself).

What is the difference between jet puffed marshmallow creme and marshmallow fluff? ›

Is Fluff the same as Marshmallow Creme? Generically, they are the same, but Fluff is made by a costly, batch-whipping process. Creme is whipped in a continuous mixing process.

Can you use outdated marshmallow fluff? ›

The best thing to do is smell it, taste it, and if tastes fine , it probably is fine.

What's the difference between marshmallow and marshmallow fluff? ›

Marshmallows and marshmallow fluff are similar but not identical products. Marshmallow fluff is made using a batch-whipping process from corn and sugar syrups, dried egg whites and vanillin. Marshmallows, which are firmer, also include gelatin, confectioners' sugar and corn starch.

Are M&M's gluten-free? ›

The following Mars candies have no gluten-containg ingredients: M&Ms (except pretzel, crispy, and potentially seasonal items) Milky Way Caramel Bars (not the original Milky Way Bar) Snickers Bars.

Are Doritos gluten-free? ›

The short answer: no, most Doritos are not gluten-free. Doritos are tortilla chips, which means that the chip itself is mostly made out of corn flour and then flavored with a variety of spices.

Is popcorn gluten-free? ›

Popcorn is naturally gluten-free and suitable for most people with gluten sensitivities or celiac disease. Still, some individuals who react to gluten may also be sensitive to certain proteins in corn. What's more, some commercial products may be cross-contaminated with gluten or include glutenous ingredients.

Why is fudge so hard to make? ›

Conversely, if the cooking time is too brief and there is not enough evaporation, too much water will remain and the fudge will be too soft. A temperature of 112°C to 114°C (234°F to 237°F) must be maintained. This will ensure the fudge has the ideal concentration of water and sugar. Fudge is difficult to make.

What happens if you boil fudge too long? ›

Candy that isn't cooked long enough will end up too soft; overcooking makes fudge crumbly or hard. High-quality fudge has many small crystals. If the process of crystallization begins too early, fewer crystals form and they become much larger.

Should I stir fudge while boiling? ›

Stir the ingredients to dissolve the sugar until the mixture comes to a boil. If your recipe uses milk, stirring will keep the mixture from curdling. But once it reaches about 236–238 degrees F/113–114 degrees C (the "soft-ball" stage), do not stir it or even shake the pan.

How do you harden marshmallow fluff? ›

You might be wondering if marshmallow fluff has the tendency of getting hardened. Yes it does, marshmallow fluff can get hardened. One of the easiest ways for marshmallow fluff to get hardened is through the exposure of cool temperatures and air.

Why isn t my marshmallow mixture thickening? ›

The key to getting the perfect marshmallow consistency is in the mixing. As you mix all the hot ingredients together, you inherently add air to the recipe. This air gives your marshmallow its fluff. And as more and more air enters the mix, the gelatin and sugar cool and set.

Why is my marshmallow too soft? ›

-If the finished marshmallows are too soft, it's likely your thermometer isn't accurate. Test it in a pot of boiling water; if you live at sea level, the temperature should read 212ºF (100ºC).

Should fudge set in the fridge? ›

The ratio of chocolate to condensed milk needs to be just right, otherwise you might end up with fudge that is too soft or too hard. Do not freeze the fudge to set it. Best way is to just be patient for a couple hours and set it in the fridge. If your fudge hasn't set, then you've gone wrong somewhere else.

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